Medgar Evers – Black History Month

Civil rights activist Medgar Evers was born on July 2, 1925, in Decatur, Mississippi.

In 1954, he became the first state field secretary of the NAACP in Mississippi.

As such, he organized voter-registration efforts and economic boycotts, and investigated crimes perpetrated against blacks.

A college graduate, Evers became active in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s. Following the 1954 ruling of the United States Supreme Court in Brown v. Board of Education that segregated public schools were unconstitutional, Evers challenged the segregation of the state-supported public University of Mississippi, applying to law school there. He also worked for voting rights, economic opportunity, access to public facilities, and other changes in the segregated society. Evers was awarded the 1963 NAACP Spingarn Medal.

Evers was assassinated in 1963 by Byron De La Beckwith,[2] a member of the White Citizens’ Council in Jackson, Mississippi. This group was formed in 1954 in Mississippi to resist the integration of schools and civil rights activism. As a veteran, Evers was buried with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery.[3] His murder and the resulting trials inspired civil rights protests; his life and these events inspired numerous works of art, music, and film. All-white juries failed to reach verdicts in the first two trials of Beckwith in the 1960s. He was convicted in 1994 in a new state trial based on new evidence.

Medgar’s widow, Myrlie Evers, became a noted activist in her own right, serving as national chair of the NAACP. His brother Charles Evers was the first African American to be elected as mayor of a city in Mississippi in the post-Reconstruction era; he won the office in 1969 in Fayette.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medgar_Evers

Published by amongthefray

News with a historical perspective. Fighting against misinformation, hate, and revisionist history.

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